Gallery: 2015 Aperture Summer Open: Black Mirror

by Michael Goldstein

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Written by Michael Goldstein for THE ARTISTS FORUM MAGAZINE
Edited by
Amos White V for THE ARTISTS FORUM, INC
Photo
: Michael Goldstein

REVIEWER RATINGS:
5 out of 5 stars

2015 APERTURE SUMMER OPEN: BLACK MIRROR

New York, NY (July 25, 2015) As modern civilization creeps closer and closer into a world dominated solely by technology, we find ourselves in a dimension of unease and how the single push of a button can change one’s life from heaven to total hell. Such a cultural unease is best demonstrated in Black Mirror – the latest exhibition presented by the Aperture Foundation – 547 West 27th Street, 4th Floor, from July 16 – August 13, 2015.

Last night’s visit showed me that everything you see in this gallery may not be only discomforting, but also a strong reflection regarding they way modern civilization views its technological advances. Look no further than Michael Wolf’s Street View Triptych #2 (Animals), a trinity of screenshots taken straight out of the natural world. That would seem harmless enough, but when viewed closer it becomes clear that these images, in their nearly-pixelated lens, reflect the lack of desire of a physical experience outdoors. What we have here is the symbolic representation of our unwavering worship of our PC’s and Mac’s for information.

From left to right: “Green Speculation“, “Blue Speculation“, and “Red Speculation” by Sarah Meyohas

Sarah Meyohas’ three works, Green Speculation, Blue Speculation, and Red Speculation, truly capture the descent of morality in the age of the iPhone. All three function almost like a magnifying glass, zooming on the specific details, fishing them out, and exploiting them for our own desires. Blue Speculation in particular appears to fully symbolize our lust for dirty secrets, as it lures you deeper and deeper into the inner workings and dark past of the mind. And then take what you found and do whatever you want with it.

When you exit Black Mirror, you might find yourself coming out a bit more self-aware of just how vicious our reliance on information just to function day to day with the outside world is.

For more information about the Aperture Gallery, visit: aperture.org

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