Gallery: Dianne Bernstein: Painted Women – Their Moods and Mystery

by Michael Goldstein

Magazine     >    Reviews


Written by Michael Goldstein for THE ARTISTS FORUM MAGAZINE
Edited by
Amos White V for THE ARTISTS FORUM, INC
Photo
: Michael Goldstein

REVIEWER RATINGS:
4 out of 5 stars

DIANNE BERNSTEIN: PAINTED WOMEN – THEIR MOODS AND MYSTERY AT NAWA GALLERY

NEW YORK, NY (June 10, 2015) On June 2nd, the NAWA (National Association of Women Artists) Gallery began a month-long exhibition highlighting the astonishingly colorful works of Dianne Bernstein, a woman who, at least in my opinion, has quite the sense of style when it comes to her expressionistic paintings. The thirteen canvases of Painted Women – Their Moods and Mystery on display at the gallery, showcase a massively vivid state of control as the brushstrokes come together to form an emotional state that appears to travel from figure to figure.

For example, the painting Caliente, is very much alive, as conveyed in the center figure’s practically fearless display. Despite the bright blue background, very clearly can you see the disdain captured within the figure’s eyes. There is an amazing power hidden behind the eyes, which clearly conveys a state of contempt with the current troubles of the world, an emotional state that turns to smoking cigars to press her troubles away. In fact, the blue background works as a brilliant contrast and immediately invites you to focus your eyes to the darkest colors on the canvas.

Three paintings from the Dianne Bernstein series “Painted Women – Their Moods and Mystery” at NAWA

There is also a fascination component in the painting Little Black Spot, whose canvas divides attention between the figure and the titular black spot appearing to be dripping down the wall. The rigid composure of her glare is something worth study alone, but the black spot to her left could imply a lot of things. Could it possibly be a pocket of negative feeling that currently follows her wherever she goes, invading her perspective of the world? Or maybe it could be symbolic of her frustrations. Even more, what are those frustrations? Who knows?

Each one of Bernstein’s thirteen paintings could make its own gallery thanks to the emotions they convey and display. The gallery wraps up at the end of June, so get there soon and take a look around and feel things you’ve never felt before.

For more information about Dianne Bernstein, visit: thewomansart.com.
For more information about the National Association of Women Artists, visit: thenawa.org

Related Articles

Leave a Comment